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Gold futures ended lower Friday, as gains for stocks and oil futures fizzled and but a rising U.S. dollar kept the metal under $1,700 an ounce.
Weker demand helps lower U.S.gasoline Prices
Gold futures ended lower Friday, as gains for stocks and oil futures fizzled and but a rising U.S. dollar kept the metal under $1,700 an ounce.
Weker demand helps lower U.S.gasoline Prices
Crude-oil futures end a see-sawing Friday higher, holding on to modest gains as U.S. equities lost steam and a rising dollar kept the
Weker demand helps lower U.S.gasoline Prices
Gold futures ended lower Friday, as gains for stocks and oil futures fizzled and
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Finance News
EXCLUSIVE-Google suspends some business with Huawei after Trump blacklist -source

(Adds source quotes, analyst quotes, background)

By Angela Moon

NEW YORK, May 19 (Reuters) - Alphabet Inc's Google has suspended business with Huawei that requires the transfer of hardware, software and technical services except those publicly available via open source licensing, a source familiar with the matter told Reuters on Sunday, in a blow to the Chinese technology company that the U.S. government has sought to blacklist around the world.

The move could hobble Huawei's smartphone business outside China as the tech giant will immediately lose access to updates to Google's Android operating system. The next version of its Android smartphones will also lose access to popular services including the Google Play Store and Gmail and YouTube apps.

"Huawei will only be able to use the public version of Android and will not be able to get access to proprietary apps and services from Google," the source said.

The Trump administration on Thursday added Huawei Technologies Co Ltd to a trade blacklist, immediately enacting restrictions that will make it extremely difficult for the company to do business with U.S. counterparts.

On Friday the U.S. Commerce Department said it was considering scaling back restrictions on Huawei to "prevent the interruption of existing network operations and equipment." It was not immediately clear on Sunday whether Huawei's access to mobile software would be affected.

The extent to which Huawei will be hurt by the U.S. government's blacklist is not yet known as its global supply chain assesses the impact. Chip experts have questioned Huawei's ability to continue to operate without U.S. help.

Details of the specific services affected by the suspension were still being discussed internally at Google, according to the source. Huawei attorneys are also studying the impact of the blacklist, a Huawei spokesman said on Friday. Huawei was not immediately reachable for further comment.

Representatives of the U.S. Commerce Department did not immediately have comment.


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Huawei will continue to have access to the version of the Android operating system available through the open source license, known as Android Open Source Project (AOSP), that is available for free to anyone who wishes to use it. There are about 2.5 billion active Android devices worldwide, according to Google.

But Google will stop providing Huawei with access, technical support and collaboration involving its proprietary apps and services going forward, the source said.

Huawei has said it has spent the last few years preparing a contingency plan by developing its own technology in case it is blocked from using Android. Some of this technology is already being used in products sold in China, the company has said.

In an interview with Reuters in March, Eric Xu, rotating chairman of Huawei, struck a defiant note in anticipation of retaliatory actions by U.S. companies. "No matter what happens, the Android Community does not have any legal right to block any company from accessing its open-source license," he said.

Popular Google apps such as Gmail, YouTube and the Chrome browser that are available through Google's Play Store will disappear from future Huawei handsets as those services are not covered by the open source license and require a commercial agreement with Google.

But users of existing Huawei devices who have access to the Google Play Store will still be able to download app updates provided by Google. Apps such as Gmail are updated through the store, unlike operating system updates which are typically handled by phone manufacturers and telecoms carriers, which the blacklist could affect, the source said.

The impact is expected to be minimal in the Chinese market. Most Google mobile apps are banned in China, where alternatives are offered by domestic competitors such as Tencent and Baidu.

Huawei's European business, its second-biggest market, could be hit as Huawei licenses these services from Google in Europe.

"Having those apps is critical for smartphone makers to stay competitive in regions like Europe," said Geoff Blaber, vice president of research at CCS Insight.

(Reporting by Angela Moon; Additional reporting by Georgina Prodhan in London, and David Shepardson and Karen Freifeld in Washington; Editing by Kenneth Li and Daniel Wallis)

Marlen Ochoa-Lopez: Police not alerted to early clues in case of murdered teenager who ‘had baby cut from womb’

Police and Illinois' child welfare agency have said staff at a Chicago-area hospital did not alert them after determining that a bloodied woman who arrived with a gravely-ill newborn had not just given birth to the baby boy, as she claimed.

The woman, Clarisa Figueroa, was charged more than three weeks later with killing the baby's mother, Marlen Ochoa-Lopez, after police found her body outside Ms Figueoa's home.

Chicago police said she cut Ochoa-Lopez's baby out of her womb on 23 April, then called 911 to report she had given birth to a baby who was not breathing.

Paramedics took Ms Figueroa and the baby to Advocate Christ Medical Centre in suburban Oak Lawn.

Ochoa-Lopez's family spent those weeks searching for her and holding press conferences pleading for help finding her, unaware that the child was in a neonatal intensive care unit on life support.

The baby remained hospitalised on life support on Saturday, according to authorities.

Prosecutors said when Ms Figueroa was brought with the baby to the hospital, she had blood on her upper body and her face, which a hospital employee cleaned off. They also said Ms Figueroa was examined at the hospital and showed no physical signs of childbirth.

Advocate Christ Medical Centre has declined to say whether or when it contacted authorities, citing state and federal regulations.

Oak Lawn police said they were not contacted about Ms Figueroa by the medical centre or any other agency.

Illinois Department of Children and Family Services spokesperson Jassen Strokosch said on Saturday the agency was alerted 9 May that there were questions about who had custody of the child in order to make medical decisions. He said he could not speculate about why the agency was not contacted sooner.

"We don't know what was happening at the hospital," he said.

Mr Strokosch said the Department of Children and Family Services was alerted by someone required by law to contact the department about suspected abuse or neglect, but he could not say who contacted the agency.

However, that was after Chicago police had connected Ms Figueroa to Ochoa-Lopez's disappearance.

Chicago Police Superintendent Eddie Johnson said police learned Ochoa-Lopez was missing when her husband reported it on 24 April.

On 7 May, Chicago police learned from one of Ochoa-Lopez's friends that she had been communicating via a private Facebook group with Ms Figueroa about buying clothing. Police then went to Ms Figueroa's home, where her 24-year-old daughter eventually told them her mother had recently had a baby.

"There was nothing to point us in that direction in the beginning," Mr Johnson told reporters on Thursday, after police had arrested Ms Figueroa and her daughter on murder charges.

Police spokesperson Anthony Guglielmi said on Saturday that authorities had to subpoena medical records from the hospital for Ms Figueroa and the child.

He said police did not learn Ms Figueroa showed no signs of childbirth until "a couple weeks" after she was examined.

Both Mr Johnson and Mr Guglielmi referred questions about hospital protocol and policies to the medical centre. A spokesperson said in an emailed statement: "We have been cooperating with authorities and as this is an ongoing police matter, we're referring all inquiries to local law enforcement."

DNA testing determined Ms Figueroa was not the baby's mother and that Ochoa-Lopez's husband was his father.

Mr Strokosch said his department let protective custody of the child lapse on 13 May because his father had been identified.

Associated Press

Bernie Sanders: 'Beating Trump is not good enough'

Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., says his presidential campaign is about much more than beating President Trump.

"That is not enough," Sanders said Sunday on NBC's "Meet the Press" when asked about Democratic rival Joe Biden's approach to global warming.

In a speech in Philadelphia the day before, Biden said: "If you want to know what the first and most important plank in my climate proposal is: Beat Trump."

Sanders argued that defeating Trump is only the first step.

"It goes without saying that we've got to defeat Donald Trump, who in my view is the most dangerous president in the modern history of this country. He's a pathological liar. He's a sexist and a racist, et cetera, et cetera," he said.

He continued: "But if we're talking, for example, about climate change, what the scientists tell us is we have 12 years before irreparable damage is done to this planet. Beating Trump is not good enough. You've got to beat the fossil fuel industry. You have to talk on all of those forces of the status quo who do not want to move this country to energy efficiency and sustainable energy."

This was not the first time Sanders took a shot at Biden over the former vice president's approach to global warming. Earlier this month, Sanders responded after Biden's campaign said it was seeking a "middle ground" on the issue.

"There is no 'middle ground' when it comes to climate policy," Sanders wrote on Twitter without directly naming Biden.

"I've never been middle of the road on the environment," Biden later contended, saying he has been talking about climate change since 1987. "Nobody has been more consistent about taking on the environment and a green revolution than I have."

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